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  • 25
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Answer:
Surge suppressors use a metal oxide varistor (mov) to suppress surges. Its an electrical component that increases its resistance as voltage increases. A large surge can cause them to burn up, literally. This is probably the noise you heard. It probably saved all of your equipment.
MOVs fail in an open state. You are n… see more
Surge suppressors use a metal oxide varistor (mov) to suppress surges. Its an electrical component that increases its resistance as voltage increases. A large surge can cause them to burn up, literally. This is probably the noise you heard. It probably saved all of your equipment.
MOVs fail in an open state. You are no longer being protected. If you get surged again it will fry your stuff. Throw that one out and buy a new one. see less
Surge suppressors use a metal oxide varistor (mov) to suppress surges. Its an electrical component that increases its resistance as voltage increases. A large surge can cause them to burn up, literally. This is probably the noise you heard. It probably saved all of your equipment.
MOVs fail in an open state. You are no longer being protected. If you get surged again it will fry your stuff. Throw that one out and buy a new one.

gerakis
· April 9, 2017
  • 14
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"Certified? Probably not. If you zoom in on the picture of the back of the unit, it appears to say Conforms to UL 498 and 1449. I believe "conforms to" means the manufacturer claims to meet the standard(s), but it probably hasn't been independently tested to verify the claim. Apparently no UL sticker. UL 1449 is t… see more "Certified? Probably not. If you zoom in on the picture of the back of the unit, it appears to say Conforms to UL 498 and 1449. I believe "conforms to" means the manufacturer claims to meet the standard(s), but it probably hasn't been independently tested to verify the claim. Apparently no UL sticker. UL 1449 is the relevant std for Surge Protective Devices, but the Voltage Protection Rating (VPR) of 900 Volts is high, indicating rather poor protection (lower is better; the best products I've seen have a VPR of 400 V). UL 498 is "Standard for Attachment Plugs and Receptacles" so conformance to that probably isn't a lot to brag about. Brands like Tripplite and APC have affordable products with good, low VPRs and lifetime replacement warranties. see less "Certified? Probably not. If you zoom in on the picture of the back of the unit, it appears to say Conforms to UL 498 and 1449. I believe "conforms to" means the manufacturer claims to meet the standard(s), but it probably hasn't been independently tested to verify the claim. Apparently no UL sticker. UL 1449 is the relevant std for Surge Protective Devices, but the Voltage Protection Rating (VPR) of 900 Volts is high, indicating rather poor protection (lower is better; the best products I've seen have a VPR of 400 V). UL 498 is "Standard for Attachment Plugs and Receptacles" so conformance to that probably isn't a lot to brag about. Brands like Tripplite and APC have affordable products with good, low VPRs and lifetime replacement warranties.
MJ
· August 9, 2017
  • 14
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NOT two different voltages. Different charging current. My phone is S3 mini, and it is required only 1A for charging. Once I "forced" to charge by 2A (need plug in and reboot the phone), my battery was damaged. It was inflating 3 times the thickness :). Lesson is learned. The 2A charging current for other high charging… see more NOT two different voltages. Different charging current. My phone is S3 mini, and it is required only 1A for charging. Once I "forced" to charge by 2A (need plug in and reboot the phone), my battery was damaged. It was inflating 3 times the thickness :). Lesson is learned. The 2A charging current for other high charging current devices. see less NOT two different voltages. Different charging current. My phone is S3 mini, and it is required only 1A for charging. Once I "forced" to charge by 2A (need plug in and reboot the phone), my battery was damaged. It was inflating 3 times the thickness :). Lesson is learned. The 2A charging current for other high charging current devices.
caferhum
· February 7, 2017
  • 3
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I wouldn't recommend. Probably contact a electrician to convert 220 to lower voltage.
WASECPRO
· July 13, 2017
  • 1
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No
John Logan
· February 7, 2017
  • 1
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No, I believe not.
Donna
· June 12, 2019
  • 1
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Are there outlets anywhere on a plane besides the bathrooms? Or, is this your own private plane?
IW - female - 61
· April 30, 2018
  • 1
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I did with mine. Works great and doesn't mess with the top outlet.
SCarter
· February 26, 2017
  • 0
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I would not do that it is not going to be properly grounded. Even the adapters with the third wire prong that you can screw to the plate is not sufficient grounding
Mark A. Cappuzzo
· July 3, 2017
  • 0
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Absolutely
Christina M.
· February 21, 2019