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Well, not many attics have Internet connections, and the heat in most attics would be too great to "hide" the drive there. A closet will work as long as have access to a power outlet and either direct Ethernet connection to a router (by running Cat 5 cable through the walls or via the attic), or use a wireless Ethernet… see more Well, not many attics have Internet connections, and the heat in most attics would be too great to "hide" the drive there. A closet will work as long as have access to a power outlet and either direct Ethernet connection to a router (by running Cat 5 cable through the walls or via the attic), or use a wireless Ethernet bridge to your home's main wired/wireless Internet connection. I have two of these in a credenza behind locked doors, but I've drilled a one-inch hole (with grommet) through the back of the cabinet, and then run the NAS drive's power cable and Cat 5 cable from the unit to my home's wireless router, which in turn is connected to the Gigabit modem provided by my Internet provider. But, you do need regular access to the device in case you need to swap out drives (for backups), or in case the drive hangs (you might get a "red" light on the front of the device. So, if you hide it away, make sure you can access it for maintenance or for backup drive swapout. see less Well, not many attics have Internet connections, and the heat in most attics would be too great to "hide" the drive there. A closet will work as long as have access to a power outlet and either direct Ethernet connection to a router (by running Cat 5 cable through the walls or via the attic), or use a wireless Ethernet bridge to your home's main wired/wireless Internet connection. I have two of these in a credenza behind locked doors, but I've drilled a one-inch hole (with grommet) through the back of the cabinet, and then run the NAS drive's power cable and Cat 5 cable from the unit to my home's wireless router, which in turn is connected to the Gigabit modem provided by my Internet provider. But, you do need regular access to the device in case you need to swap out drives (for backups), or in case the drive hangs (you might get a "red" light on the front of the device. So, if you hide it away, make sure you can access it for maintenance or for backup drive swapout.
Jim The Golf Pro
· November 21, 2017
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Yes ,and add more drives as you need to .
FredD
· July 28, 2015
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I can not get much information about the internals, just what the Admin console provides. There is 2 GB memory, but I do not know about the processors.
Steve Howard
· April 10, 2015
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No it does not. At least not yet. Moreover, WD recommends that you use the same disk for each of the bays. For example use all WD Red 2 TB disks. (By the way, they recommend the Red series because this disk is designed for 24/7 server use, but you can use any manufacturer's server rated disks.) You can use any number o… see more No it does not. At least not yet. Moreover, WD recommends that you use the same disk for each of the bays. For example use all WD Red 2 TB disks. (By the way, they recommend the Red series because this disk is designed for 24/7 server use, but you can use any manufacturer's server rated disks.) You can use any number of bays. 1-4. Right now I am using 3 bays and when I purchased hard drives, I purchased an identical spare. see less No it does not. At least not yet. Moreover, WD recommends that you use the same disk for each of the bays. For example use all WD Red 2 TB disks. (By the way, they recommend the Red series because this disk is designed for 24/7 server use, but you can use any manufacturer's server rated disks.) You can use any number of bays. 1-4. Right now I am using 3 bays and when I purchased hard drives, I purchased an identical spare.
Whit Smith
· October 13, 2015
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I can't give good answer. I use it only for backups.
NA2000
· June 7, 2016
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Sorry, I only speak English. :(
btone2009
· April 25, 2019
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The unit is spec'd out with WD Red hard drives, that are made for NAS service and maintain lower temperatures for confined server space. The site specifically states that 7,200 and 10,000 rpm hard drives are not supported. I guess you could try them, but if you are buying one of these units, a key feature is the high… see more The unit is spec'd out with WD Red hard drives, that are made for NAS service and maintain lower temperatures for confined server space. The site specifically states that 7,200 and 10,000 rpm hard drives are not supported. I guess you could try them, but if you are buying one of these units, a key feature is the high data transfer rates for read and write of these units. I did not want to take the chance of compromising this, as I use my unit to serve media (video and audio) to all of my computers, game consoles, tablets, and phones. Works great! My last NAS was a dog and could barely serve audio without stopping and stuttering. see less The unit is spec'd out with WD Red hard drives, that are made for NAS service and maintain lower temperatures for confined server space. The site specifically states that 7,200 and 10,000 rpm hard drives are not supported. I guess you could try them, but if you are buying one of these units, a key feature is the high data transfer rates for read and write of these units. I did not want to take the chance of compromising this, as I use my unit to serve media (video and audio) to all of my computers, game consoles, tablets, and phones. Works great! My last NAS was a dog and could barely serve audio without stopping and stuttering.
J. S. Landers
· October 16, 2015
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No, this is not made for a solid state drives, it has 3.5" Drive bays for NAS ready drives like the WD Red drives.
Ted
· July 4, 2015
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No, it doesn't have a DVD slot.
RicardoB
· September 3, 2015
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Mine was labeled 8 TB total and while I would have expected four 2 TB drives mine came with two 4 TB drives and two empty bays. So I'm not sure what the deal is. I actually prefer this as I use two for RAID and the other two for single backup or media drives.
Steve and Amy
· April 10, 2015