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  • 76
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Answer:
My last 4 purchases of Duracell's over the previous 3 years, AA, AAA, 9 volt and D sizes, had an unreasonable number, 40 percent, that leaked even though they were fresh dated, used and stored in home at room temperatures. A smaller percentage, 20 percent, were fresh dated brand new and found to be dead. This quality p… see more My last 4 purchases of Duracell's over the previous 3 years, AA, AAA, 9 volt and D sizes, had an unreasonable number, 40 percent, that leaked even though they were fresh dated, used and stored in home at room temperatures. A smaller percentage, 20 percent, were fresh dated brand new and found to be dead. This quality problem with Duracell is not just with Amazon purchases, but Duracell purchases from Home Depot, Lowes and Walgreens as well. I've had it with Duracell's poor quality and leaking batteries, and have since replaced, and thrown away all new and used Duracell batteries in the trash where they belong. Duracell used to be a quality product, but not any more. see less My last 4 purchases of Duracell's over the previous 3 years, AA, AAA, 9 volt and D sizes, had an unreasonable number, 40 percent, that leaked even though they were fresh dated, used and stored in home at room temperatures. A smaller percentage, 20 percent, were fresh dated brand new and found to be dead. This quality problem with Duracell is not just with Amazon purchases, but Duracell purchases from Home Depot, Lowes and Walgreens as well. I've had it with Duracell's poor quality and leaking batteries, and have since replaced, and thrown away all new and used Duracell batteries in the trash where they belong. Duracell used to be a quality product, but not any more.
Cheyenne5203
· April 30, 2016
  • 37
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My AAs bought in about July 2017 are stamped 12-2026. The AAs I bought in late 2015 or so are stamped 8-2025. The 9Vs I bought in early 2017 are stamped 8-2021. The AAAs I bought in early to mid 2017 are stamped 6-2027. The D cells I bought in December 2017 are stamped 10-2022. All are shrink wrapped so they can't… see more My AAs bought in about July 2017 are stamped 12-2026. The AAs I bought in late 2015 or so are stamped 8-2025. The 9Vs I bought in early 2017 are stamped 8-2021. The AAAs I bought in early to mid 2017 are stamped 6-2027. The D cells I bought in December 2017 are stamped 10-2022. All are shrink wrapped so they can't make contact with other batteries or metal items in whatever drawer or box you store them in. I haven't had a dud yet and have used about 200 Amazon alkaline batteries. see less My AAs bought in about July 2017 are stamped 12-2026. The AAs I bought in late 2015 or so are stamped 8-2025. The 9Vs I bought in early 2017 are stamped 8-2021. The AAAs I bought in early to mid 2017 are stamped 6-2027. The D cells I bought in December 2017 are stamped 10-2022. All are shrink wrapped so they can't make contact with other batteries or metal items in whatever drawer or box you store them in. I haven't had a dud yet and have used about 200 Amazon alkaline batteries.
Amazon Customer
· February 4, 2018
  • 32
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I like AmazonBasics products, so I was excited to see these batteries. To find out if they were a good value, I looked up data online. Bottom line:
-- For flashlights, toys, and steady drain devices, you'll be better off buying Rayovac Alkalines here on Amazon.
-- For cameras and photo flashes, Duracell Coppertops will… see more
I like AmazonBasics products, so I was excited to see these batteries. To find out if they were a good value, I looked up data online. Bottom line:
-- For flashlights, toys, and steady drain devices, you'll be better off buying Rayovac Alkalines here on Amazon.
-- For cameras and photo flashes, Duracell Coppertops will be better.
Here's why: Rayovacs cost a little bit more per battery, but they hold more energy than these AmazonBasics batteries. As a result, the final price per amount of power is about the same. You just won't have to change batteries as often.
Those Rayovacs work best in steady drain devices, but not so well in cameras or flashes. For those high drain devices, Duracell Coppertops hold up better and end up being cheaper.
Battery Ninja tested these AmazonBasics AA's in toothbrushes I did some calculations and found that these batteries offer a reasonable price per unit of power (mWh), but that they do not carry as much energy as others. The test results show that these batteries will run out faster than others, at least in the toothbrushes. There were no test results vs. digital cameras, photo flashes, or toys, so I'm extrapolating that these will perform like Rayovacs, not like Duracell Coppertops.
So, the only data to compare here is the toothbrush test. For energy delivered, these AmazonBasics batteries cost about the same as Rayovac batteries but will die sooner. To say that another way, these batteries cost less, but also deliver less power.
Both Rayovac and Amazon Basics are better than Energizer batteries, which appear to consistently give less power and still cost more. I guess the money goes to the Energizer Bunny.
Duracell Coppertops will last longer in flashlights, toys, and toothbrushes, but cost a little bit more per unit of power (mWh). On the other hand, they hold up better in cameras and similar electronics. They're probably the best all around battery. So, if you don't like changing batteries and a willing to spend a tiny bit more, Coppertops are a good way to go.
Finally, the best value battery is interesting: it is the Costco Kirkland Signature. Battery Ninja's results show that and so do the tests from Consumer Reports. You can buy those Costco batteries here on Amazon, but the price is higher than you'd get at the club. Of course, I'm not a Costco member, so it doesn't matter to me... but buying them here on Amazon is not a good value. see less
I like AmazonBasics products, so I was excited to see these batteries. To find out if they were a good value, I looked up data online. Bottom line:
-- For flashlights, toys, and steady drain devices, you'll be better off buying Rayovac Alkalines here on Amazon.
-- For cameras and photo flashes, Duracell Coppertops will be better.
Here's why: Rayovacs cost a little bit more per battery, but they hold more energy than these AmazonBasics batteries. As a result, the final price per amount of power is about the same. You just won't have to change batteries as often.
Those Rayovacs work best in steady drain devices, but not so well in cameras or flashes. For those high drain devices, Duracell Coppertops hold up better and end up being cheaper.
Battery Ninja tested these AmazonBasics AA's in toothbrushes I did some calculations and found that these batteries offer a reasonable price per unit of power (mWh), but that they do not carry as much energy as others. The test results show that these batteries will run out faster than others, at least in the toothbrushes. There were no test results vs. digital cameras, photo flashes, or toys, so I'm extrapolating that these will perform like Rayovacs, not like Duracell Coppertops.
So, the only data to compare here is the toothbrush test. For energy delivered, these AmazonBasics batteries cost about the same as Rayovac batteries but will die sooner. To say that another way, these batteries cost less, but also deliver less power.
Both Rayovac and Amazon Basics are better than Energizer batteries, which appear to consistently give less power and still cost more. I guess the money goes to the Energizer Bunny.
Duracell Coppertops will last longer in flashlights, toys, and toothbrushes, but cost a little bit more per unit of power (mWh). On the other hand, they hold up better in cameras and similar electronics. They're probably the best all around battery. So, if you don't like changing batteries and a willing to spend a tiny bit more, Coppertops are a good way to go.
Finally, the best value battery is interesting: it is the Costco Kirkland Signature. Battery Ninja's results show that and so do the tests from Consumer Reports. You can buy those Costco batteries here on Amazon, but the price is higher than you'd get at the club. Of course, I'm not a Costco member, so it doesn't matter to me... but buying them here on Amazon is not a good value.

Leonard
· May 15, 2016
  • 17
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10 year shelf life, they are the new and improved version.
Caya
· December 28, 2014
  • 6
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The batteries I have were made in Indonesia.
Laurence K
· March 16, 2015
  • 5
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I have purchased and used these several times and I have never had them
Leak

Something clever
· November 2, 2015
  • 3
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Packs of 4.
Robert Blackader
· March 13, 2015
  • 3
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No leaking yet
Becky Rush
· August 5, 2016
  • 3
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Wow odd set of responses to your question. Why anyone let alone 2 separate people would go to the bother of answering only to say "sorry, I don't know" is mind boggling, and the other responses apparently failed to correctly read your question. That said, to answer your question, no, I don't believe there is any poss… see more Wow odd set of responses to your question. Why anyone let alone 2 separate people would go to the bother of answering only to say "sorry, I don't know" is mind boggling, and the other responses apparently failed to correctly read your question. That said, to answer your question, no, I don't believe there is any possible way that amazon fires tick could somehow block batteries other than amazon's from working. Even if the could I can't imagine that they would. The amount of annoyance they would cause and the amount of backlash they would receive from that kind of restriction would have to make it utterly unworthwhile. Imagine how awful it would be if every manufacturer made their devices only operable with their own brand of battery. see less Wow odd set of responses to your question. Why anyone let alone 2 separate people would go to the bother of answering only to say "sorry, I don't know" is mind boggling, and the other responses apparently failed to correctly read your question. That said, to answer your question, no, I don't believe there is any possible way that amazon fires tick could somehow block batteries other than amazon's from working. Even if the could I can't imagine that they would. The amount of annoyance they would cause and the amount of backlash they would receive from that kind of restriction would have to make it utterly unworthwhile. Imagine how awful it would be if every manufacturer made their devices only operable with their own brand of battery.
Sajiky
· November 18, 2017
  • 3
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Answer:
Alkaline batteries don't *hold* a charge so much as they *generate* electricity by a chemical reaction. If you try to charge them, you can get them to *hold* a charge, but it's not the same as the initial charge. Trying to recharge them generates a lot of hydrogen, which means the battery is likely to leak from then … see more Alkaline batteries don't *hold* a charge so much as they *generate* electricity by a chemical reaction. If you try to charge them, you can get them to *hold* a charge, but it's not the same as the initial charge. Trying to recharge them generates a lot of hydrogen, which means the battery is likely to leak from then on, and because it produces a lotr of heat, you can even get an explosion. Nothing like Naasaki or Hiroshima, of course, but trying to clean uip the mess and replace the charger (and anything else in the immediate vicinity results in mareital discord ("I *told* you sp!) and if it happens at the wrong time, could result in blindness.
NiCad and LiO batteries are designed from the get-go to be rechargeable, and that's why they have to cost more. If someone could make them as cheaply as alkaline batteries, competition would knock the Alkaline cells off the market. Do yourself a big favor and DON'T try to recharge alkaline batteries. (And don't toss alkaline batteries in a fire, either.) see less
Alkaline batteries don't *hold* a charge so much as they *generate* electricity by a chemical reaction. If you try to charge them, you can get them to *hold* a charge, but it's not the same as the initial charge. Trying to recharge them generates a lot of hydrogen, which means the battery is likely to leak from then on, and because it produces a lotr of heat, you can even get an explosion. Nothing like Naasaki or Hiroshima, of course, but trying to clean uip the mess and replace the charger (and anything else in the immediate vicinity results in mareital discord ("I *told* you sp!) and if it happens at the wrong time, could result in blindness.
NiCad and LiO batteries are designed from the get-go to be rechargeable, and that's why they have to cost more. If someone could make them as cheaply as alkaline batteries, competition would knock the Alkaline cells off the market. Do yourself a big favor and DON'T try to recharge alkaline batteries. (And don't toss alkaline batteries in a fire, either.)

Steve Thomas
· October 14, 2015