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  • 58
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Answer:
Alkaline primary batteries are generally not rated by capacity in mAh like you may find on rechargeables. This is because the actual delivered power in mAh is highly dependent on the discharge rate and cannot be standardized across all applications.
From another forum:
"Alkaline batteries have a significant internal r… see more
Alkaline primary batteries are generally not rated by capacity in mAh like you may find on rechargeables. This is because the actual delivered power in mAh is highly dependent on the discharge rate and cannot be standardized across all applications.
From another forum:
"Alkaline batteries have a significant internal resistance compared with rechargables. This means the greater the current draw, the more of their energy they waste generating heat in the battery.
Additionally, alkaline batteries supply a gradually decreasing voltage as they discharge, so for some applications they become useless even while they technically have a fair bit of energy left in them. Flashlights are a nice example - a mini-maglite goes from bright to sickly in about thirty minutes with alkalines, even though they'll give a weak beam for a few hours after that, and run a radio for a while even after that. Rechargables tend to have a relatively flat discharge curve.
This makes a mAh figure less useful for alkalines than for rechargables, or even downright misleading." see less
Alkaline primary batteries are generally not rated by capacity in mAh like you may find on rechargeables. This is because the actual delivered power in mAh is highly dependent on the discharge rate and cannot be standardized across all applications.
From another forum:
"Alkaline batteries have a significant internal resistance compared with rechargables. This means the greater the current draw, the more of their energy they waste generating heat in the battery.
Additionally, alkaline batteries supply a gradually decreasing voltage as they discharge, so for some applications they become useless even while they technically have a fair bit of energy left in them. Flashlights are a nice example - a mini-maglite goes from bright to sickly in about thirty minutes with alkalines, even though they'll give a weak beam for a few hours after that, and run a radio for a while even after that. Rechargables tend to have a relatively flat discharge curve.
This makes a mAh figure less useful for alkalines than for rechargables, or even downright misleading."

S. Byers
· September 3, 2015
  • 20
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    votes
Answer:
10 year shelf life, they are the new and improved version.
Caya
· December 28, 2014
  • 7
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Answer:
The batteries I have were made in Indonesia.
Laurence K
· March 16, 2015
  • 5
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Answer:
I only used two from the pack. My entire experience was 1 hour of use. The batteries got so hot they start to burn the toy that I inserted them in. I was afraid that the batteries were going to explode. I extracted them from the toy and they burned my hand.
John L Ferrell
· November 2, 2015
  • 4
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Answer:
Packs of 4.
Robert Blackader
· March 13, 2015
  • 3
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Answer:
We personally haven't noticed any difference between the larger brand and these. We don't use them in heavy draining electronics like cameras but in remotes, toys etc., they are really great!!!
Would recommend and buy again!

darcy
· May 3, 2015
  • 3
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    votes
Answer:
Alkaline batteries don't *hold* a charge so much as they *generate* electricity by a chemical reaction. If you try to charge them, you can get them to *hold* a charge, but it's not the same as the initial charge. Trying to recharge them generates a lot of hydrogen, which means the battery is likely to leak from then … see more Alkaline batteries don't *hold* a charge so much as they *generate* electricity by a chemical reaction. If you try to charge them, you can get them to *hold* a charge, but it's not the same as the initial charge. Trying to recharge them generates a lot of hydrogen, which means the battery is likely to leak from then on, and because it produces a lotr of heat, you can even get an explosion. Nothing like Naasaki or Hiroshima, of course, but trying to clean uip the mess and replace the charger (and anything else in the immediate vicinity results in mareital discord ("I *told* you sp!) and if it happens at the wrong time, could result in blindness.
NiCad and LiO batteries are designed from the get-go to be rechargeable, and that's why they have to cost more. If someone could make them as cheaply as alkaline batteries, competition would knock the Alkaline cells off the market. Do yourself a big favor and DON'T try to recharge alkaline batteries. (And don't toss alkaline batteries in a fire, either.) see less
Alkaline batteries don't *hold* a charge so much as they *generate* electricity by a chemical reaction. If you try to charge them, you can get them to *hold* a charge, but it's not the same as the initial charge. Trying to recharge them generates a lot of hydrogen, which means the battery is likely to leak from then on, and because it produces a lotr of heat, you can even get an explosion. Nothing like Naasaki or Hiroshima, of course, but trying to clean uip the mess and replace the charger (and anything else in the immediate vicinity results in mareital discord ("I *told* you sp!) and if it happens at the wrong time, could result in blindness.
NiCad and LiO batteries are designed from the get-go to be rechargeable, and that's why they have to cost more. If someone could make them as cheaply as alkaline batteries, competition would knock the Alkaline cells off the market. Do yourself a big favor and DON'T try to recharge alkaline batteries. (And don't toss alkaline batteries in a fire, either.)

Steve Thomas
· October 14, 2015
  • 2
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Answer:
The dollar tree are better batteries. These don't last long at all.
Kim
· February 19, 2016
  • 1
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    votes
Answer:
no
R. regwan
· August 26, 2017
  • 1
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    votes
Answer:
No, Indonesia
Trekkie
· January 25, 2018