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Showing 1-10 of 29 questions
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Answer:
Either side - depends where you want it grounded. This one allows DC pass through for standard PoE and PoE+. However, some PoE+ peripherals may exceed the clamp voltage
Tim S.
· April 30, 2016
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This surge suppressor uses fast gas discharge tubes (GDTs) to suppress high energy transients, typically from lightning, but with very low capacitance so as to not affect high speed data circuits (yes this unit works for GigE). The GDTs will show physical damage after a high energy event that leads to failure. Take a l… see more This surge suppressor uses fast gas discharge tubes (GDTs) to suppress high energy transients, typically from lightning, but with very low capacitance so as to not affect high speed data circuits (yes this unit works for GigE). The GDTs will show physical damage after a high energy event that leads to failure. Take a look after any lightning hit or nearby hit to your building. However, a series of smaller events may not lead to visible failure, so the unit should be replaced based on an expected frequency of smaller surge events. Note GDTs require high voltage and induced current to trigger, so a close lightning strike (e.g., your backyard) may be one minor GDT event. Check the unit and replace after ~20 such events. A GDT/MOV tester can be purchased, but they are very $$$$ (continuity test is insufficient, you need a breakdown discharge test). A multimeter continuity test will show open for a good GDT and a typcially failed GDT (failure closed is possible after a severe event in which case damage is visible) For a typical GDT datasheet see Littlefuse SL1003A Series GDTs here: http://www.littelfuse.com/~/media/electronics/product_catalogs/littelfuse_gdt_catalog.pdf.pdf see less This surge suppressor uses fast gas discharge tubes (GDTs) to suppress high energy transients, typically from lightning, but with very low capacitance so as to not affect high speed data circuits (yes this unit works for GigE). The GDTs will show physical damage after a high energy event that leads to failure. Take a look after any lightning hit or nearby hit to your building. However, a series of smaller events may not lead to visible failure, so the unit should be replaced based on an expected frequency of smaller surge events. Note GDTs require high voltage and induced current to trigger, so a close lightning strike (e.g., your backyard) may be one minor GDT event. Check the unit and replace after ~20 such events. A GDT/MOV tester can be purchased, but they are very $$$$ (continuity test is insufficient, you need a breakdown discharge test). A multimeter continuity test will show open for a good GDT and a typcially failed GDT (failure closed is possible after a severe event in which case damage is visible) For a typical GDT datasheet see Littlefuse SL1003A Series GDTs here: http://www.littelfuse.com/~/media/electronics/product_catalogs/littelfuse_gdt_catalog.pdf.pdf
Anthony C Topper
· July 15, 2016
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You should ground the surge protector to your house's common electric ground so mount it as close to your power meter as possible and connect the ground wire there.
Dustin
· May 25, 2017
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Yes it will be protectec
Arcadio Bernal Riveros
· June 5, 2016
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Yes
ezeze5000
· September 17, 2019
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Yes you must do both sides
WildBugle
· October 26, 2016
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I guess? it is a pass through device. Whatever goes in goes through, except power surges.
Barry

B. G. Kery
· September 4, 2019
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I never add the 'extra protection for purchases.
Butch
· September 17, 2019
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You would connect the LAN side to the In on the surge protector and the camera to the out side of the surge protector.
Adam L.
· October 9, 2015
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Yes, there is a grounding connector near the middle bottom of the printed circuit board. Get a piece of copper wire (solid copper preferred), crimp the copper wire to the O-ring terminal, connect the O-ring terminal back to the PCB, and extended the remaining end of the copper wire to a ground rod or other appropriatel… see more Yes, there is a grounding connector near the middle bottom of the printed circuit board. Get a piece of copper wire (solid copper preferred), crimp the copper wire to the O-ring terminal, connect the O-ring terminal back to the PCB, and extended the remaining end of the copper wire to a ground rod or other appropriately earth-grounded device. see less Yes, there is a grounding connector near the middle bottom of the printed circuit board. Get a piece of copper wire (solid copper preferred), crimp the copper wire to the O-ring terminal, connect the O-ring terminal back to the PCB, and extended the remaining end of the copper wire to a ground rod or other appropriately earth-grounded device.
JohnDball-dot-com
· August 2, 2018