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Answer:
Your question was not stupid, in spite of what the other person said. Many people do not understand the subtle differentiation between the different models, and if you're planning on charging an AGM battery these differences are important. The Battery Tender (non-Plus version) and the Battery Tender Plus are differen… see more Your question was not stupid, in spite of what the other person said. Many people do not understand the subtle differentiation between the different models, and if you're planning on charging an AGM battery these differences are important. The Battery Tender (non-Plus version) and the Battery Tender Plus are different chargers which behave differently. If you have an AGM battery, you want to use the Plus version, not the regular Battery Tender. Both the regular Battery Tender and the Battery Tender Plus have an absorption charge mode, but the maximum charge voltage is different for the non-Plus vs. the Plus version. This is because the AGM battery requires a higher voltage than the Battery tenders designed for conventional wet-cell lead-acid batteries were designed to deliver. The Plus version, which came after the regular version, uses a higher voltage that is required by the AGM type of battery. The lower voltage of the non-plus version will partially charge the AGM battery and go into maintenance mode prematurely. It will not fully charge an AGM battery so it will not do as good a job. The Plus version also has a timer to hold the absorption voltage longer than the non-Plus version. These specific changes in the Plus model were made to accommodate the charging requirements of Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) style lead acid batteries. Although a Battery Tender (non-Plus) will "charge" an AGM battery most of the way, it doesn't fully charge the battery as well as the Plus version. For an AGM battery you want the Plus variant, for a non-AGM battery you want the non-Plus variant. see less Your question was not stupid, in spite of what the other person said. Many people do not understand the subtle differentiation between the different models, and if you're planning on charging an AGM battery these differences are important. The Battery Tender (non-Plus version) and the Battery Tender Plus are different chargers which behave differently. If you have an AGM battery, you want to use the Plus version, not the regular Battery Tender. Both the regular Battery Tender and the Battery Tender Plus have an absorption charge mode, but the maximum charge voltage is different for the non-Plus vs. the Plus version. This is because the AGM battery requires a higher voltage than the Battery tenders designed for conventional wet-cell lead-acid batteries were designed to deliver. The Plus version, which came after the regular version, uses a higher voltage that is required by the AGM type of battery. The lower voltage of the non-plus version will partially charge the AGM battery and go into maintenance mode prematurely. It will not fully charge an AGM battery so it will not do as good a job. The Plus version also has a timer to hold the absorption voltage longer than the non-Plus version. These specific changes in the Plus model were made to accommodate the charging requirements of Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) style lead acid batteries. Although a Battery Tender (non-Plus) will "charge" an AGM battery most of the way, it doesn't fully charge the battery as well as the Plus version. For an AGM battery you want the Plus variant, for a non-AGM battery you want the non-Plus variant.
Customer
· April 29, 2015
  • 30
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Answer:
John,
California just passed a law that requires manufactures of battery chargers to be more energy efficient. They are saying battery chargers take too much electricityy to run them. Some manufacturers are beginning to re-tool so they can comply. However this is a double edged sword. Consumers in California will m… see more
John,
California just passed a law that requires manufactures of battery chargers to be more energy efficient. They are saying battery chargers take too much electricityy to run them. Some manufacturers are beginning to re-tool so they can comply. However this is a double edged sword. Consumers in California will most likely pay more for the chargers than what they will save in electricity use in a years time.
Joe see less
John,
California just passed a law that requires manufactures of battery chargers to be more energy efficient. They are saying battery chargers take too much electricityy to run them. Some manufacturers are beginning to re-tool so they can comply. However this is a double edged sword. Consumers in California will most likely pay more for the chargers than what they will save in electricity use in a years time.
Joe

Boat and RV Accessories
Seller · March 22, 2014
  • 16
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Answer:
If you've already tried other chargers and they won't charge that battery, it's possible that this one won't either. Check the voltage of the "dead" battery. It's a very good charger, but it requires a battery that has at least 3 volts in order to charge. The Battery Tender manual has this to say:
"If you try to cha… see more
If you've already tried other chargers and they won't charge that battery, it's possible that this one won't either. Check the voltage of the "dead" battery. It's a very good charger, but it requires a battery that has at least 3 volts in order to charge. The Battery Tender manual has this to say:
"If you try to charge a dead battery having a voltage below 3 Volts, BATTERY
TENDER® chargers will not start. An internal safety circuit prevents the
BATTERY TENDER® chargers from generating any output voltage unless it
senses at least 3 Volts at the charger output. In this situation, the amber light will
continue to flash."
There is a way to charge this battery, though. If you have another battery that has more voltage, you can connect both batteries in parallel (positive to positive & negative to negative), then attach a charger and it will charge both batteries. The Battery Tender has "non-sparking" circuitry, but if your existing charger doesn't, you should remember to connect the charger leads so as to prevent sparks. I use this memory jogger when connecting and disconnecting battery cables: "If you only have one lead connected, it positively must be positive".
Thus, connect the red lead from the charger first; then the black (negative). When you disconnect the charger, disconnect the black first so that the positive (red) is the only lead connected. Same thing with jump starting one car from another. see less
If you've already tried other chargers and they won't charge that battery, it's possible that this one won't either. Check the voltage of the "dead" battery. It's a very good charger, but it requires a battery that has at least 3 volts in order to charge. The Battery Tender manual has this to say:
"If you try to charge a dead battery having a voltage below 3 Volts, BATTERY
TENDER® chargers will not start. An internal safety circuit prevents the
BATTERY TENDER® chargers from generating any output voltage unless it
senses at least 3 Volts at the charger output. In this situation, the amber light will
continue to flash."
There is a way to charge this battery, though. If you have another battery that has more voltage, you can connect both batteries in parallel (positive to positive & negative to negative), then attach a charger and it will charge both batteries. The Battery Tender has "non-sparking" circuitry, but if your existing charger doesn't, you should remember to connect the charger leads so as to prevent sparks. I use this memory jogger when connecting and disconnecting battery cables: "If you only have one lead connected, it positively must be positive".
Thus, connect the red lead from the charger first; then the black (negative). When you disconnect the charger, disconnect the black first so that the positive (red) is the only lead connected. Same thing with jump starting one car from another.

Shop Till You Drop
· December 7, 2015
  • 10
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Answer:
if your battery is low it may take up to 3 0r 4 days since it's a low amp charge and designed to keep the battery at full charge once it's at full charge. This charger is super for use when you don't drive the vehicle a lot and it sits for any length. it can be used on the battery in the car or taken out, once it's on … see more if your battery is low it may take up to 3 0r 4 days since it's a low amp charge and designed to keep the battery at full charge once it's at full charge. This charger is super for use when you don't drive the vehicle a lot and it sits for any length. it can be used on the battery in the car or taken out, once it's on it can stay plugged in all winter of summer just unplug it when you go driving. If the car stays outside they make a waterproof model. If your looking for a fast charger this is not what you want, if you do buy this make sure it's the 12 volt model ... hope this will help you see less if your battery is low it may take up to 3 0r 4 days since it's a low amp charge and designed to keep the battery at full charge once it's at full charge. This charger is super for use when you don't drive the vehicle a lot and it sits for any length. it can be used on the battery in the car or taken out, once it's on it can stay plugged in all winter of summer just unplug it when you go driving. If the car stays outside they make a waterproof model. If your looking for a fast charger this is not what you want, if you do buy this make sure it's the 12 volt model ... hope this will help you
paul levine
· December 3, 2013
  • 4
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    votes
Answer:
While I have no long-term practical experience with that use case, that's one of the main points of this type of Battery Tender: the Maintain mode should not "burn off" water (electrolyze molecules) in measurable amounts.
So note the level of your cells and check after 3 months and again after 6 months: it should not h… see more
While I have no long-term practical experience with that use case, that's one of the main points of this type of Battery Tender: the Maintain mode should not "burn off" water (electrolyze molecules) in measurable amounts.
So note the level of your cells and check after 3 months and again after 6 months: it should not have changed, with the Battery Tender connected all the time. see less
While I have no long-term practical experience with that use case, that's one of the main points of this type of Battery Tender: the Maintain mode should not "burn off" water (electrolyze molecules) in measurable amounts.
So note the level of your cells and check after 3 months and again after 6 months: it should not have changed, with the Battery Tender connected all the time.

Michael M.
· January 10, 2015
  • 3
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    votes
Answer:
I think a trickle charger can over charge a battery which can damage it. The battery tender senses the full charge and goes into a no charge mode during that time. Then when over time the battery loses some of its charge the battery tender goes back into the charging mode to restore the full charge.
Vincent B.
· February 11, 2017
  • 3
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    votes
Answer:
A 'fairly' dead battery should charge up in about 24 - 36 hours. If the battery has access ports, you might want to check the water level (DISTILLED water only). If it is low in any of the chambers, then you would fill that chamber with distilled water up to the bottom of a concave meniscus level at the markers.
( htt… see more
A 'fairly' dead battery should charge up in about 24 - 36 hours. If the battery has access ports, you might want to check the water level (DISTILLED water only). If it is low in any of the chambers, then you would fill that chamber with distilled water up to the bottom of a concave meniscus level at the markers.
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meniscus ) If there are NO access ports on the battery (sealed) and the light does not change to green after about 48 hours, you might think about getting a new battery. Make sure that the terminals are clean and that the connections to the charger and to the battery are solid. see less
A 'fairly' dead battery should charge up in about 24 - 36 hours. If the battery has access ports, you might want to check the water level (DISTILLED water only). If it is low in any of the chambers, then you would fill that chamber with distilled water up to the bottom of a concave meniscus level at the markers.
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meniscus ) If there are NO access ports on the battery (sealed) and the light does not change to green after about 48 hours, you might think about getting a new battery. Make sure that the terminals are clean and that the connections to the charger and to the battery are solid.

VN PH CIB TET
· October 10, 2013
  • 3
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    votes
Answer:
Not designed for exposure to water...
Tom
· July 13, 2016
  • 3
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    votes
Answer:
The power cord to the charger is 6'3" long. The cord from the unit to its end is also 6'3" long. It ends in a quick connect/disconnect plug. The alligator clamp cord plugs into that connector. So the overall length from wall outlet to the battery is about 14'. If that's too short you can order quick connect plug extens… see more The power cord to the charger is 6'3" long. The cord from the unit to its end is also 6'3" long. It ends in a quick connect/disconnect plug. The alligator clamp cord plugs into that connector. So the overall length from wall outlet to the battery is about 14'. If that's too short you can order quick connect plug extension cords. They make one extension cord that's 24 feet long. I use an extension cord that's about 2 feet long with a quick connect on one end and two rings on the other. The rings fit onto the bolts of the battery clamps. I leave it connected to the batttery and the other end is accessible through the grille, so that I can plug in the unit without having to open the hood. see less The power cord to the charger is 6'3" long. The cord from the unit to its end is also 6'3" long. It ends in a quick connect/disconnect plug. The alligator clamp cord plugs into that connector. So the overall length from wall outlet to the battery is about 14'. If that's too short you can order quick connect plug extension cords. They make one extension cord that's 24 feet long. I use an extension cord that's about 2 feet long with a quick connect on one end and two rings on the other. The rings fit onto the bolts of the battery clamps. I leave it connected to the batttery and the other end is accessible through the grille, so that I can plug in the unit without having to open the hood.
Clyde Logan
· July 23, 2013
  • 3
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Answer:
I don't think it matters as long as you find a conductive part of the frame. I used the battery terminal.
J. Loveman
· July 20, 2014