It says the voltage is 120 volts. "voltage" what does that mean? Do you have to plug it in, or something?

asked on November 29, 2017

Showing 1-8 of 8 answers

Is this a fake question? There’s no mention of 120 volts that I can find, and Fire extinguishers are not rated by voltage (just class C for electrical fires)
ADKFerrets.
· September 29, 2018
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It's rated for electrical fires up to 120 volts.
Amazon Customer
· February 14, 2018
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I do not see any reference to a voltage for this item. Perhaps the reference you saw was an error that they have removed. Regardless, it's unlikely that a fire extinguisher would not be rated for up to 120 volts as voltage ratings (if included) are more along the lines of "lower voltages below 1000 volts". In short, I wouldn't worry about it, these types of extinguishers are fine for any appliance voltages you might encounter in a normal household.
B Alexander
· May 2, 2018
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My Extinguisher charges fine.... I'm using 220
Marco
· October 26, 2019
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This was probably a copy and paste error from another product description since they also make fire alarms that plug into an electrical outlet. These should be fine for any household voltages encountered in the world, which typically are under 250 volts (in the US, 220/240 is used for electric ranges, dryers, and some … see more This was probably a copy and paste error from another product description since they also make fire alarms that plug into an electrical outlet. These should be fine for any household voltages encountered in the world, which typically are under 250 volts (in the US, 220/240 is used for electric ranges, dryers, and some other appliances while the standard outlet voltage for most things like televisions, blenders, and such are 110-125 volts. (The actual voltage may vary somewhat depending on how close you are to the power company's step down transformer for the nominal 220/240 volt line that feeds your house, which carries 110/125 volts on each side of the line to ground. Use the extinguisher on any household fire and you should be fine. see less This was probably a copy and paste error from another product description since they also make fire alarms that plug into an electrical outlet. These should be fine for any household voltages encountered in the world, which typically are under 250 volts (in the US, 220/240 is used for electric ranges, dryers, and some other appliances while the standard outlet voltage for most things like televisions, blenders, and such are 110-125 volts. (The actual voltage may vary somewhat depending on how close you are to the power company's step down transformer for the nominal 220/240 volt line that feeds your house, which carries 110/125 volts on each side of the line to ground. Use the extinguisher on any household fire and you should be fine.
T2000KW
· October 19, 2019
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I am looking at mine now. There is absolutely no way to plug this extinguisher into anything. Must be a mistaken description.
J. Futrell
· November 29, 2017
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This extinguisher is meant to put out electrical fires in addition to paper and grease, etc. I would assume the 120 volts is the limit for the type of electrical fire. In other words, if your electric cookstove (220-240V) caught fire, this might not be the recommended extinguisher to use, but for a grease fire on the cooktop would it be good. Probably means you could suffer electrical shock at higher voltages. Merely assumptions, of course.
T. McGinnis
· December 5, 2017
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I’m sorry, it is probably inappropriate, but whoever asked this question is as dumb as a pile of bricks.
Ilya Yankov
· May 8, 2018
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