Why does this card show 119gb in my galaxy tab e and not the whole 128gb?

asked on September 26, 2017

Showing 1-10 of 12 answers

128,000,000,000 ÷ (1024×1024×1024) = ~ 119 GB
Luvamazon
· November 12, 2017
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Storage companies define 1GB as 1000MB, while software define 1GB as 1024MB (which is correct). Consider this a marketing trick,- your phone shows you correct info.
basicTech
Seller · September 26, 2017
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Memory is sold with the idea that 1KB is 1000 bytes. So for marketing, 128GB = 128,000,000,000 bytes. When your device reads the card, it reads 1KB as 1024 bytes. 1GB to your device equals 1,073,741,824 bytes. So we take the 128GB the card advertises and divide it by how the device defines 1GB. 128,000,000,000 ÷ 1,073,741,824 = ~119.21
Brian
· June 15, 2018
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Formatting takes up data storage. The correct size of the card is 128GB. you lose storage space after the formatting process. It has nothing to do with marketing tricks. Its the same with formatting a hard drive.
G. M. Amash
· August 14, 2018
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MB = megabyte = (power of 10)
MiB = mebibyte = (power of 2 - a.k.a. binary)
see more
MB = megabyte = (power of 10)
MiB = mebibyte = (power of 2 - a.k.a. binary)

1GB = 1000 ^ 3
1GiB = 1024 ^ 3 = 2 ^ 30

Review IEEE 1541 issued in 2002.

Linux Kernel has used IEC prefix since 2001.

Long history in the timeline of binary prefixes.

Maybe less a marketing ploy and more unintentional ambiguity.

Thanks to Bruce Barrow for shedding some light 1997 (A Lesson in Megabytes):
https://thierry-lequeu.fr/data/PELS/Comm/Publications/Newsletter/9704/STORY18.HTML

Wolfram agrees that "MB = 1024 ^ 2" is deprecated in favor of MiB:
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Megabyte.html

b = (b)it = bit
B = (B)yte
kb = (k)ilo(b)it = kbit
kB = (k)ilo(B)yte
Kib = (K)ebi(b)it = Kibit
KiB = (K)ebi(B)yte
Mb = (M)ega(b)it = Mbit
MB = (M)ega(B)yte
Mib = (M)eb(i)(b)it = Mibit
MiB = (M)eb(i)(B)yte
etc. see less
MB = megabyte = (power of 10)
MiB = mebibyte = (power of 2 - a.k.a. binary)

1GB = 1000 ^ 3
1GiB = 1024 ^ 3 = 2 ^ 30

Review IEEE 1541 issued in 2002.

Linux Kernel has used IEC prefix since 2001.

Long history in the timeline of binary prefixes.

Maybe less a marketing ploy and more unintentional ambiguity.

Thanks to Bruce Barrow for shedding some light 1997 (A Lesson in Megabytes):
https://thierry-lequeu.fr/data/PELS/Comm/Publications/Newsletter/9704/STORY18.HTML

Wolfram agrees that "MB = 1024 ^ 2" is deprecated in favor of MiB:
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Megabyte.html

b = (b)it = bit
B = (B)yte
kb = (k)ilo(b)it = kbit
kB = (k)ilo(B)yte
Kib = (K)ebi(b)it = Kibit
KiB = (K)ebi(B)yte
Mb = (M)ega(b)it = Mbit
MB = (M)ega(B)yte
Mib = (M)eb(i)(b)it = Mibit
MiB = (M)eb(i)(B)yte
etc.

page2pagepro
· December 18, 2018
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The reason is NOT because bad math... the REASON it shows as having less available memory is because it requires roughly 8-10% of the storage device's memory to create what's called the File Allocation Table, which tells the device the card is plugged into where at in the storage the data is locate. It's a type of reference table. This is true for EVERY type of electronic storage, from SSDs and HDDs to Micro SDs and Flash drives
ken walker
· June 29, 2019
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Although I could give you an extremely technical answer, I will provide a general description along with an analogy that everyone should be able to understand. Your Galaxy device is showing you the space available for you to use, not necessarily the total space on the device. The SD card is essentially a solid state di… see more Although I could give you an extremely technical answer, I will provide a general description along with an analogy that everyone should be able to understand. Your Galaxy device is showing you the space available for you to use, not necessarily the total space on the device. The SD card is essentially a solid state disk drive, and disks must be partitioned to organize the data stored on them. By analogy, think of your bedroom dresser. You don't really get to use all the space inside because some of it is taken up by hardware, rails, drawers, framing, etc. that makes the dresser useful for organizing, finding, and accessing things stored in the dresser. see less Although I could give you an extremely technical answer, I will provide a general description along with an analogy that everyone should be able to understand. Your Galaxy device is showing you the space available for you to use, not necessarily the total space on the device. The SD card is essentially a solid state disk drive, and disks must be partitioned to organize the data stored on them. By analogy, think of your bedroom dresser. You don't really get to use all the space inside because some of it is taken up by hardware, rails, drawers, framing, etc. that makes the dresser useful for organizing, finding, and accessing things stored in the dresser.
Jeff
· September 6, 2019
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Buy... Obey.....
Amazon Customer
· March 26, 2019
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SSDs often have a small amount allocated for over-provisioning which improves performance and endurance.
Me
· January 26, 2019
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Hey the the reason why is because most all devices require anywhere from 8 to 10 gbs for internal use
Carlton G
· December 19, 2018
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